SOME IMPRESSIONS OF THE ROUND-GERMANY FLIGHT 1925
Flight June 1925
turn up " is rewarded by a considerable improvement in the
weather. The sun even threatens to shine, and one begins to
feel that things might be a lot worse, after all. A Junkers
biplane goes up, and gentlemen with megaphones announce
that a parachute descent is about to be made. The parachute,
which is of the free type, opens quickly but looks to be
somewhat small, and the rate of fall is considerably more
rapid than we are accustomed to in England.
Shortly afterwards a Dietrich biplane takes off in a most
spectacular fashion, the pilot not flattening out after his
zoom an instant too soon. As we have never seen a German
pilot stunting before, and it is announced that we are to be
treated to an exhibition, we watch the Dietrich with interest.
The " show," however, turns out to be a very tame one,
and would certainly not satisfy a blase English crowd. The
simple loops and " Immelmann turns " arc not wildly exciting,
The scoring boards are beginning to ofler more attractions,
and by 11.40 a.m. they announce that the Udet 10 has passed
Miinster and is on its way to Cassel, while the Baumer
monoplane has reached Miinster. The Albatros L.69 is on
its way to Minister from Bremen, as are also another U.10
and the U.8, so that evidently the Udet machines are doing
well. The rest of the machines are spread about along the
route, some of them down with minor troubles and others
carrying on at lower speed.
For some time no reports come through, but unless something
has happened the U.10 should be ncaring home, and
about two o'clock the little red monoplane comes in sight,,
going very fast down wind, and, swooping down past the
enclosures, turns into the wind and lands. Herr Billik is
given a well-deserved cheer, and one begins to speculate
upon the identity of No. 2 home. He soon arrived at a
very fast pace, and turns out to be Ungewitter on the Albatros
I..69. During the rest of the afternoon 2/ more machines
returned, making a total of 23 out of the 50 or so that started
this morning.
Twelve more machines returned to the Berlin aerodrome
during Monday, among which was the little Darmstadt monoplane
with Blackburn engine, so that out of the total of fifty
machines or so, thirty-five returned within the prescribed time
limit.
turn up " is rewarded by a considerable improvement in the
weather. The sun even threatens to shine, and one begins to
feel that things might be a lot worse, after all. A Junkers
biplane goes up, and gentlemen with megaphones announce
that a parachute descent is about to be made. The parachute,
which is of the free type, opens quickly but looks to be
somewhat small, and the rate of fall is considerably more
rapid than we are accustomed to in England.
Shortly afterwards a Dietrich biplane takes off in a most
spectacular fashion, the pilot not flattening out after his
zoom an instant too soon. As we have never seen a German
pilot stunting before, and it is announced that we are to be
treated to an exhibition, we watch the Dietrich with interest.
The " show," however, turns out to be a very tame one,
and would certainly not satisfy a blase English crowd. The
simple loops and " Immelmann turns " arc not wildly exciting,
The scoring boards are beginning to ofler more attractions,
and by 11.40 a.m. they announce that the Udet 10 has passed
Miinster and is on its way to Cassel, while the Baumer
monoplane has reached Miinster. The Albatros L.69 is on
its way to Minister from Bremen, as are also another U.10
and the U.8, so that evidently the Udet machines are doing
well. The rest of the machines are spread about along the
route, some of them down with minor troubles and others
carrying on at lower speed.
For some time no reports come through, but unless something
has happened the U.10 should be ncaring home, and
about two o'clock the little red monoplane comes in sight,,
going very fast down wind, and, swooping down past the
enclosures, turns into the wind and lands. Herr Billik is
given a well-deserved cheer, and one begins to speculate
upon the identity of No. 2 home. He soon arrived at a
very fast pace, and turns out to be Ungewitter on the Albatros
I..69. During the rest of the afternoon 2/ more machines
returned, making a total of 23 out of the 50 or so that started
this morning.
Twelve more machines returned to the Berlin aerodrome
during Monday, among which was the little Darmstadt monoplane
with Blackburn engine, so that out of the total of fifty
machines or so, thirty-five returned within the prescribed time
limit.